Online Course Syllabus:
World History to 1500


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Lectures & Readings

Emayzine Home

VICTOR VALLEY COLLEGE
Fall 2012
WORLD HISTORY 103 section 41621
Instructor: Dr. Eric Mayer,
VVC Email    Eric.Mayer@vvc.edu
EMAIL: history103@gmail.com
Website: www.emayzine.com

Skype   dr.eric.mayer

All lecture notes can be downloaded for free from the site. Prerequisite: None—;But there is an intensive amount of analytical writing in this course as well as critical thinking. However, it is assumed that most of you do not have college level or academic writing skills and there will be online help available.

Course Objectives: The student will be able to: Understand historical causality Analyze historical events Explain historical events and processes Think critically about historical events Write analytically to explain the course of history
*Note: Syllabus subject to possible revision

Requirements: None

Course Description: The course is a world history course and for this reason will not be a Euro-centric history course. Course will focus on the beginnings of civilization some five to seven thousand years ago in Mesopotamia, Africa, Asia and the Americas. We will then proceed to Classical Civilizations, the Axis Age and conclude the course with an understanding of the world in 1500. Lecture will stress social, cultural, political and economic history of the various world civilizations. The readings and lectures are designed to challenge erroneous assumptions about world history and the current reality that the last 5,000 years has bequeathed to us. Therefore, the course is built around critical thinking and online historical problem solving, not rote memorization or "regimented learning". Memorization and regimentation have nothing to do with learning, but rather lead to mental conformity and the impoverishment of intellectual development. Finally, this is not a "lollipop" history course where everything works out for the best. World History is a terrible drama full of triumphs and tragedies. We will be studying world history in all its forms and not world mythstory

 

Instructional Objectives: 

Describe the components of the great civilizations of the world, and

explain what common historical denominators these civilizations

have in common.

 

1.      Explain historiographical differences and research methodologies,

and competing theories of causality and interpretation.

2.       Compare and contrast the historical development of various civilizations and the reasons for their evolution. Explain the social, political, economic, cultural and gender histories of each respective civilization.

3.       Analyze and ascribe historical causality of why things happened and the way that they did.

4.       Apply knowledge of historical theory and causality to analytical research papers that focus on explaining or solving some historical problem.

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

 

1.   Explain historiographical differences and research methodologies, and competing theories of causality and interpretation.

 

2. Compare and contrast the historical development of various civilizations and the reasons for their evolution. Explain the social, political, economic, cultural and histories of each respective civilization.

 

3. Analyze and ascribe historical causality of why things happened and the way that they did.

 

4. Apply knowledge of historical theory and causality to analytical research papers that focus on explaining or solving some historical problem

Required Texts:

(1) Patterns of World History Volume I, by Peter von Sivers et al, 2012, Oxford University Press.

ISBN 978-0-19-985898-9

(2) Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. 1250-1350, by Janet L. Abu-Lughod


All books are available for purchase at the VVC bookstore, or order them online at Victor Valley College Bookstore.  Finally…there are lecture notes and links on the site that proceed in order. And you will click to them when to get to the course readings.

Attendance: It is the students’ responsibility to make sure that they have been dropped, reinstated, or are currently enrolled in the course. I will not do any grade changes that are related to attendance or registration issues. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE BEEN DROPPED. DO NOT ASSUME THAT I WILL DROP YOU AS A MATTER OF COURSE DUE TO YOUR LACK OF ATTENDANCE. Once the semester ends I will not reinstate students so double check that you are properly enrolled in the course before the semester ends.

Grading: The grade breakdown is as follows: Essay Exam 1 = 25% of final grade; Essay Exam 2 = 25% of final grade; Final Essay Exam = 25% of final grade; Book Review = 25% of final grade. In order to pass the course all outstanding assignments or exams must be turned in by the day of the final examination. I do not round up grade percentages. I accept late work up until the last day of class, but the highest grade possible on late work is a "C". The grade splits are as follows: 90%-100% = A; 80% -89% = B; 70% -79% = C; 60% -69% = D; 0% -59% = F

Course Mechanics: The course is internet driven. Therefore it is essential to surf the net regularly and check your email everyday for updates and stuff. My ultimate goal in the course besides teaching world history is to empower students who will be able to argue logically, and back up their assertions with evidence. An objective of this course is to teach students the analytical reading and writing skills that they need to educate themselves. While the course is "text" driven I will suggest films and movies, that students can analyze The course stresses on-line, interaction. This course will not be a passive learning experience, it will be highly interactive via analytical essay writing and in terms of how you explain historical causality and outcome. I will read/proof one draft of each assignment.