History 104 Syllabus

VICTOR VALLEY COLLEGE
  Fall 2012
WORLD HISTORY 104

Section 41665
Instructor: Dr. Eric Mayer,
Office No. 32-26
College Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
EMAIL: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.emayzine.com

All lecture notes, online quizzes and course resources and can be downloaded for free from the site. Please do not bring lecture notes to class…they are for home study and Online Student use only. Prerequisite: None—But there is an intensive amount of analytical writing in this course as well as critical thinking. However, it is assumed that most of you do not have college level or academic writing skills and there will be online help available.
*Note: Syllabus subject to possible revision

Requirements: Students must stay up with all assignments and must check email daily. The key for doing well in this course and understanding the history that we cover is that you be informed as to what is happening about you. History is not "dead", it is constantly affecting your reality, and if it is dead, then we all are affected by the ghosts of the past. History is the analysis and understanding of processes that have created our present reality

The hours/week arranged listed for online classes must be fulfilled through an arrangement established between the instructor and the student. They do not represent an increase in the total number of hours for an online course. Hours/week arranged do not have to be fulfilled by in-person class attendance.….….

Course Description:


Survey of world history since 1500, stressing the interdependency of
regional histories and socioeconomic development. Of primary importance is understanding the history of the "Modern World System" as it developed from 1500 to 1993. Special attention is devoted to the historical changes and problems of economic development on a global scale. Social history is also stressed, particularly how economic development (or lack thereof) affected and affects society, culture, the status of diverse peoples, and the distribution of wealth and resources at the global level.


Beginning with the conquest and exploitation of the "New World" and its inhabitants, the course will focus for the first three weeks on the rise of a global trading system. In the first two weeks, the course will attempt to explain how a bunch of bearded, violent "barbarians" conquered the great civilizations of the world and changed the course of almost 5,000 years of history.


The second three weeks of the course will examine how these handful of northern European countries were successful in grafting their mode of production onto the rest of the world and the dislocating impact this had on the European and non-European world.


The last three weeks of the course will focus on the struggle, and at times inability of the "modern" countries to control the rest of the world. In this light, struggle and resistance in the Third World will be examined, as well as the relative decline of the US and the ascendancy of European Community and especially the Pacific Rim.

Instructional Objectives:

Upon completion of the course the student should be able to:

1. Formulate their own models of historical causality and explanation.

2. Critically read and analyze historical texts. Write analytical and synthetic essays and develop critical thinking skills in explaining not only the "development of underdevelopment", but also how this does or does not explain the development of the industrialized nations.

Student Learning Outcomes;

Upon completion of the course the student can:

SLO #1 Analyze European mercantile and colonial expansion in the period 1500-1800 and evaluate its impacts on Asian, African and American indigenous people, societies and states. 1. Explain the reasons for European expansion, militarism and colonialism in the non-European world. 2. Analyze and assess the effect that European expansion had on Asian, African and American indigenous people, societies and states. 3. Examine the development of a globalized 1. B. 16. trading system and its affect on Asian, African and American indigenous people, societies and states.

SLO #2 Evaluate the historical relationship between, political modernization, industrialism, imperialism and underdevelopment in the period 1700-1914 1. Explain the causal relationship between commodity trade, merchant activity, political modernization and industrialism. 2. Assess the reasons for lack of modernization, industrialism and underdevelopment in Asian, African, Latin American and Middle Eastern societies and states 3. Examine and evaluate the justifications for European imperialism and the responses of Asian, African, Latin American and Middle Eastern societies and states

SLO #3 Assess the history of the 20th century in terms of the struggle for independence and national self-determination Asian, African, Latin American and Middle Eastern societies and states. 1. Analyze the causal relationship between world wars and anti-colonial struggle in Asian, African, Latin American and Middle Eastern societies and states. 2. Explain post-WWII economic development in both the modern industrial nations, late-industrializing states and underdeveloped nations. 3. Evaluate the reasons for wars of national liberation/self-determination and the historical responses of modern industrial nations to these conflicts. (A) Course Objectives (The student can then:) 1. Formulate models of historical causality and explanation. 2. Critically read and analyze historical texts. 3. Write analytical and synthetic essays and develop critical thinking skills in explaining not only the "development of underdevelopment", but also how this does or does not explain the development of the industrialized nations

Required Texts:

(1) Patterns of World History Volume 2. By Peter von Sivers et al. Oxford University Press, 2012

Amazon

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Patterns-of-World-History/Peter-von-Sivers/e/9780199858989?itm=1&usri=von+sivers+world+history

or Barnes and Noble

http://www.amazon.com/Patterns-World-History-Since-1400/dp/0199858985/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1349219388&sr=1-2&keywords=von+sivers+patterns+of+world+history+volume+2

 

(2) The Age of Extremes, by Eric Hobsbawm

 

http://www.amazon.com/Age-Extremes-History-World-1914-1991/dp/0679730052/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1349219438&sr=1-1&keywords=the+age+of+extremes+a+history+of+the+world.+1914-1991

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-age-of-extremes-eric-hobsbawm/1111638323?ean=9780679730057&itm=1&usri=the+age+of+extremes





Finally…there are lecture notes and links on the site that proceed in order. And you will click to them when you get to the course readings. The audio lectures no longer function

Attendance: Students must check their email regularly/daily. It is the students’ responsibility to make sure that they have been dropped, reinstated, or are currently enrolled in the course. I will not do any grade changes that are related to attendance or registration issues. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE BEEN DROPPED. DO NOT ASSUME THAT I WILL DROP YOU AS A MATTER OF COURSE DUE TO YOUR LACK OF ATTENDANCE. I DO NOT DROP STUDENTS AND I DO NOT GIVE INCOMPLETES. I DO ACCEPT LATE WORK BUT THE HIGHEST GRADE LATE WORK MAY RECEIVE IS A "C". I DO NOT ACCEPT LATE WORK AFTER THE LAST DAY OF CLASS.

Grading: The grade break down is as follows: Essay Exam 1 = 25% of final grade; Book Analysis = 25% of final grade; Essay Exam 2 = 25% of final grade; Final Essay Exam = 25% of final grade.   In order to pass the course all outstanding assignments or essay exams must be must be received via email by the day of the final essay examination. Finally the course is progressively graded in that grades can only help you. GRADE SCALE: 90%-100% A; 80% -89% B; 70% -79% C; 60% -69% D; 0% -59% F. I do not round up grades. Late work is accepted, but the highest grade possible for late work is a C.

Course Mechanics: The course is internet driven. Therefore it is essential to surf the net regularly and check your email. My ultimate goal in the course besides teaching world history is to create students who will be able to argue logically, and back up their assertions with evidence. An objective of this course is to teach students the analytical, reading and writing skills that they need to educate themselves. While the course is "text" driven I will suggest films and movies, that students can analyze. This course will not be a passive learning experience; it will be highly interactive in terms of how you explain historical causality and outcome.